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John and Margaret _______ GIBSON
were the parents of Elizabeth GIBSON who married James WHITE b: 1749 d: August 06, 1815 in Drumore Twp., Lancaster County, PA. I have their names from a sampler created by their daughter in 1795.

With only James WHITE's birthdate to go on....it would seem that if his wife was about the same age...her parents would have been born about 1700-1725 and very likely have died before 1790 US Census. Not sure if John & Margaret ____ GIBSON came to U.S. or where they or Elizabeth GIBSON were born or buried. It's likely John and Margaret ____ GIBSON died before the 1790 census. 

Some of the children of James and Elizabeth (GIBSON) WHITE moved from Lancaster County, PA to Westmoreland County, PA about 1800. 


Gibson coat of arms

Motto: "Courage, Charity, Virtue"

Arms: Azure, three storks wings expanded argent

Crest: Out of a coronet, a lion's gamb holding an arrow gules, feathered or

Origin: The surname Gibson appears in English and Scottish records dating back to the 14th century.  It is "son of Gib" -- Gib was a popular nickname for Gilbert.

 


Cemeteries: New London Presbyterian Church Cemetery: Chester County, PA

    GIBSON, Margaret died 19 Jul 1812, aged 83 years.  possible our Margaret - but no documentation

    GIBSON, Mary died 25 Oct 1792, aged 55 years.
     GIBSON, John died 29 Dec 1814, aged 80 years. possibly our John - but no documentation
    GIBSON, Anne E. died 14 Jan 1845, aged 30 years.
    GIBSON, James died 7 Jul 1860, aged 79 years.
    GIBSON, Dorcas S. died 12 Oct 1862, aged 80 years.

New London Presbyterian Church
    1986 Newark Rd., New London, PA 19360 (610) 869-2140
The New London Presbyterian Church was founded in 1726. The first building was a small log structure located about a mile east of our present location. In 1744 a large brick building was erected on "the road to the west", now Route 896, once the main route to New Castle, Delaware. In 1844 the present building was built.

New London, settled by the Scotch-Irish immigrants who found fertile land here, differed from other settlements in that the Church became the hub of life as opposed to the town tavern of other locals.

Robert Finney, a farmer just west of the village was our first Elder and is considered the founder of the New London Presbyterian Church. The congregation and its leaders established schools that led to the founding of the Universities of Delaware and Pennsylvania and Lincoln University.

Church Webpage

http://searches.rootsweb.com/usgenweb/archives/pa/allegheny/land/swea001.txt

Samuel Gibson, (1761-1836), was placed on the pension roll of Highland Co., Ohio, 1832, for three years' actual service as spy and private in the Virginia militia. He was born in Cumberland Co., Pa.; died in Highland Co., Ohio.
DAR ID Number: 27241, 26332, 44888, 98581, 113138

John Hull, (1750-1805), served as corporal and sergeant in Capt. Benjamin Bigg's company, Col. John Gibson's regiment of Virginia militia. He was born in Winchester Co., Va.; died in Pittsburg, Pa.
DAR ID Number: 22475, Also No. 8610.

Abraham Gibson m. 1778 Mary Brown (1758-1835).
Abraham Gibson (1752-1829) served as a minute man in the Worcester County, Massachusetts militia, under different commands. He was born in Lunenburg, Mass.; died in Leicester, Vt.
Also No. 66249.

Mrs. Elizabeth Gibson Martin.
DAR ID Number: 106745
Born in Oakland County, Mich.
Wife of W. L. Martin.
Descendant of John Gibson, as follows:
1. James Patterson Gibson (b. 1849) m. 1874 Annetta Fleming (1851-1902).
2. William Henry Gibson (1804-62) m. Jane Patterson Johnston (1816-91).
3. Matthew Gibson (1774-1861) m. Mary McCormick (1771-1847).
4. John Gibson m. Mary (1737-92).
John Gibson (1734-1814) was a private, 1778, under Capt. John McKee, Chester County, Pennsylvania militia. He was born in Ireland; died in New London, Chester County, Pa.

Mrs. Sarah Jane Moore Baker, DAR ID Number: 149456
Born in Fairview, Pa., Wife of Albert N. Baker.
Descendant of John Shryock, as follows:
1. John Shryock Moore (1826-70) m. 1850 Elizabeth Sloan Gibson (1831-1908).
2. Hugh Moore (1803-89) m. 1825 Fannie Shryock (1805-90).
3. John Shryock, Jr. (1776-1859) m. Jane Conway.
4. John Shryock m. Mary Teagarden (1747-1816).
[p.149] John Shryock (1747-1831) was a patriot, member of Committee of Correspondence and signer of the Oath of Fidelity and Support in Maryland; also served as private in Capt. Philip Graybill's company, 2d Maryland brigade. He was born in Maryland; died in Butler County, Pa.
Also No. 146036.

Mrs. Margaret Sloan Moffit, DAR ID Number: 156354
Born in Pittsburg, Pa., Wife of Guy Moffit.
Descendant of Sergt. James Sloan, as follows:
1. Alvin Sloan (b. 1852) m. 1883 Amelia Patterson (b. 1861).
2. Thomas Greer Sloan (1824-97) m. 1851 Margaret Mateer (1824-85).
3. Walter Sloan (b. 1788) m. 2d Eliza Greer.
4. James Sloan m. 1787 Elizabeth Gibson.
James Sloan (1756-1818) served, 1777, as sergeant in Capt. John Clark's company, 13th Pennsylvania regiment, under Col. Walter Stewart. He was born in Lancaster; died in Kittanning, Pa.
Also No. 58633.

John Gibson (1759-1839) was a private in the 1st South Carolina regiment under Colonel Pinkney. He was born in Jones County; died in Clinton, Ga.
Also No. 145934, 163201

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter III. Indian Traders

Col. John Gibson removed to the Forks of the Ohio before the Revolutionary war. He was an Indian fighter as well as an Indian trader. He was born in Lancaster borough. It has been said that it was to him that the chief Logan delivered his famous speech on the murder of his relatives. Gibson and Logan were intimate and warm friends. He had great influence with the Indians, but knew how to punish them when they misbehaved. Col. Gibson's field of operations during the Revolutionary war was with the Western army.
History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter III. Indian Traders


Col. George Gibson, brother of John, was also born in Lancaster, and became an Indian trader and fighter. He married a daughter of Francis West, and settled at Shearman's Creek, in Perry County. He commanded a regiment during the Revolutionary war, and was in a number of battles. He was killed at "St. Clair's defeat." He was the father of John Bannister Gibson, chief justice of the State.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter XXIX. City of Lancaster

As has been shown, Hamilton laid out the first and central portion of the town in 1730. Settlements had been made here in 1721 or 1722, and by 1730 the little cluster of houses is said to have attained a population of two hundred souls. The locality was known as the Indian Field and Gibson's Pasture. George Gibson kept a tavern here when Hamilton platted the town, and had probably been located for several years. His tavern was called "the Hickory Tree," probably from a tall hickory which stood near the public road, and which was said to have been a favorite one with the Indians, the place of their rendezvous for many years, and the centre of one of their small villages. "A swamp lay in front of Gibson's," we are told, "and another to the north." The one in front of Gibson's, nearly in the centre of the site of the present city, was the Dark Hazel Swamp, which was drained and cleared of wood in 1745. The other was the Long Swamp, extending beyond the limits of the town-plat toward the northeast. Gibson's tavern is supposed to have stood about where the Slaymaker Hotel now does. His pasture, afterwards Sanderson's pasture, was rented by Mr. Hamilton about 1748, to Adam Reigart. The same year that the town was laid out, Stephen Atkinson, says Rupp, built a fulling-mill at great expense, but the inhabitants of the upper part of the creek assembled and pulled down the dam on the Conestoga, as it prevented them from rafting and getting their usual supply of fish.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter XXIX. City of Lancaster

The leading men of the town at that time were Thomas Cookson, George Gibson, Sebastian Graff, Michael Bierly, Edward Shippen, Matthias Young, John Fouke, Peter Worrall, John Dehuff, Abraham Johnston, Samuel Bethel, George Sanderson, Michael Hubley, Jacob Loughman, George Hoffman, Joseph Pugh, Robert Thompson, James Webb, Caspar Shaffner, and a few others.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter XXIX. City of Lancaster

George Gibson was a resident of the settlement before the town was laid out, and owned property on Prince Street. His son, Gen. John Gibson, was born here May 23, 1740. His career in connection with the French and Revolutionary wars is well known, and to him, it is said, the celebrated speech of Logan was delivered.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter XXIX. City of Lancaster

The first record we have of a tavern within the bounds of Lancaster City is the statement by Rupp that one was kept by Gibson as early as 1722, at the sign of "The Hickory-Tree." It was situated on the old road from Philadelphia to Wright's Ferry, which was on the original plot of the town, called, as it now is, King Street. The site was for many years occupied by Slaymaker's Hotel, later by Benjamin Champney's residence, and is now covered by the building in which is High & Martin's crockery-store.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter XXIX. City of Lancaster

"The Swan" was one of the most prominent and popular of the early taverns. The lot on which the house was located was known on the original map as No. 128, situated on Queen Street, bounded north by Penn (Centre) Square. It was granted by James Hamilton to Henry Bostler in 1736, and sold by him to Jacob Slough, March 6, 1747. Henry Bostler was licensed to sell beer in 1741, but it is not certain that he dispensed it here, as he owned several other lots in town. Matthias Slough is found mentioned in the various records as keeping the Swan as early as 1761. On the 23d of June of that year the burgesses of the borough met there. In a letter from Edward Shippen, Esq., to the Governor, dated Dec. 27, 1763, he says that "between two and three o'clock this afternoon upwards of a hundred armed men from the westward rode very fast into town, turned their horses into Mr. Slough's (an innkeeper's yard), and proceeded with the greatest precipitation to the work-house, where they stove open the door and killed all the Indians." . . . This body of men were known as the "Paxton Boys." Matthias Slough was a member of the Committee of Observation of the borough of Lancaster in 1774, and a member of the Legislature from 1774 to 1783. He was coroner from 1755 to 1768 inclusive. He continued in the tavern, under the sign of the "White Swan," until 1806, when advancing years led him to retire from active duty, and his son Jacob, who had been keeping tavern in Columbia, and on October 24th took charge of the "Swan." Matthias Slough died in Harrisburg, Sept. 12, 1812, in his seventy-ninth year, having been for sixty years a resident of Lancaster. His son continued to "speed the parting, and cheer the coming, guest" until 1824, when he gave place to John Stehman. Edward Parker became landlord in 1828, and kept the house under the name of "The Golden Swan." After Parker the house was successively under charge of Rosina Hubley, Edward S. Hubley, Henry Kendig, Henry S. Shank, Hiram Kendig, who kept it during the war, and closed in 1865, and J. M. Johnston, who was landlord until 1869. At this time the building began to be occupied by the Inland Insurance Company and other institutions, and private individuals for office purposes, and lost its distinctive character as an hostelry. The office of the New Era now occupies the upper part of the building fronting on Queen Street and the Square. A newspaper contributor says that "the 'Swan' was noted, as far back as Revolutionary times, for its good fare and genial hosts, among whom were Slough, Parker, Stehman, and others. It was the house that before the era of railroads attracted wealthy and influential travelers, who journeyed in their own conveyances from the east and south to and fro over the macadamized road leading to Philadelphia. If a modern hotel register had been kept, the guests of the 'Swan' would be found to have comprised many historical names, especially when the Continental Congress halted in the old town in its flight from Philadelphia at the time of its capture by the British army. Among the frequent guests of the house were the distinguished jurists John B. Gibson, William Tilghman, Moulton C. Rogers, Thomas Duncan, and Charles Huston, all members of the Supreme Court."

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter XLVII. East Donegal Township.<1<[1 By Samuel Evans, Esq.]

He sold his farm in 1746 to John Kyle, who was connected with the Galbraiths by marriage in some way. He was probably the father of the wife of Andrew Galbraith, the son of James G., Jr., whose daughter was the mother of Chief Justice John Bannister Gibson. Rebecca Stewart, who was a Galbraith, and had a brother John, also related to Kyle.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter XLVII. East Donegal Township.<1<[1 By Samuel Evans, Esq.]

He accumulated a very large landed estate. He moved from the Swatara to the Susquehanna, near Harris' Ferry, thence to Pennsboro' township, Cumberland Co., and was appointed one of the justices of the Court of Common Pleas for that county in 1763. In 1777 he was appointed lieutenant of Cumberland County, but on account of his great age was unable to perform the active duties of the office. He died June 11, 1786, aged eighty-three years, and left several sons and daughters, among whom were Bertram, Robert, Andrew, and John. Robert was appointed prothonotary of Bedford County. He afterwards removed to York, where he practiced law, and was elected to the General Assembly from that county, and was afterwards appointed president judge of Huntingdon County. Andrew was an officer in the Revolutionary war, and served with honor to himself and country. The late Chief Justice John Bannister Gibson married a daughter of Andrew.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter XLIX. Drumore Township.<1<[1 By William Chandler, Esq.]

Name: Gibson, David


History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter LVI. Ful

George Gibson, March 12, 1743, 10 acres, between John Dilworth and Samuel Gibson, with Hugh Porter's survey on warrant of Nov. 27, 1750, in Fulton. See Hugh Porter hereinafter.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter LVI. Ful

John Gibson, May 9, 1745, 50 acres.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter LVI. Ful

William Husband, Nov. 9, 1750, 50 acres in company with Vincent King; 130 acres surveyed and patented to them May 16, 1753, on Soapstone Hill, in Fulton township, near the Little Britain line, now owned by Jeremiah G. Brown's heirs, heirs of John Gibson, Esq., and various others.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter LXIV. Little Britain Township.<1<[1 By John C. Lewis, Esq.]

William Gibson was an early settler in the township. He appears to have owned a part of Alexander Ross' 500 acres, and on April 11, 1749, applied for 60 acres adjoining that and John Jamison, and on May 24th for 40 acres adjoining his other land, John Jamison, and John Atchison. This land he sold to James Johnson, Feb. 8, 1760, and after passing through various hands it is now owned by John Work's heirs, James Hand, and divers others. He afterwards purchased the Dilworth properties, before noticed, and also considerable real estate east of Oak Hill, as well as a tract located by David McComb, adjoining the Dilworth land. These were divided between his two sons, William getting the Oak Hill and John the Dilworth land. John died young, about 1797, while William lived to a good old age, added to his possessions, and died about 1847, without direct heirs. John's property was divided between his two sons on their coming of age. William became involved, and his property was bought by his Uncle William of Oak Hill, who suffered him still to remain on it till his own death, in 1847, when it was confirmed to William, Jr., who held it till his death, about two years ago, when it was sold to C. C. Cauffman and Robert A. Scott. John added to his possessions by industry and economy, and his estate still remains to his heirs. For ten years he held the position of a magistrate.


History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter LXIV. Little Britain Township.<1<[1 By John C. Lewis, Esq.]

John Jamison, one amoug the earliest settlers, having purchased the right of Alexander Ross, under a warrant dated Nov. 5, 1714, took up, by warrant of March 4, 1742, 142 acres adjoining. John Jamison appears to have had three sons,--John, William, and Samuel. To John he transferred a part of his said land, and he dying without issue, left it to his widow Susanna, who conveyed that part to her husband's two brothers, Samuel and William. John Allison and Susanna Jamison, executors of John Jamison, deceased, sold the western part of the whole tract to William Gibson, Nov. 20, 1751, as before referred to. (See William Gibson.) William and Samuel appear to have divided the remainder between them. Samuel also obtained a survey of 208 acres, made for William Orr, who transferred the same to the use of the said Samuel Jamison, who, with Catharine, his wife, sold to Samuel Mitchell, April 3, 1771. Samuel and Margaret Mitchell sold to Jeremiah Brown (saddler), Sept. 18, 1795, after which it was divided and subdivided. William Jamison mortgaged his to John Allison, July 28, 1765, and the whole passed from the hands of the Jamison family. Samuel Jamison, great-grandson of the first John Jamison, afterward purchased from Jacob Garber about 45 acres (part of the 142 acres), which is now in the hands of his daughters, and is all that is now in the name of the large possessions of their ancestor. The whole tract as now divided is held by Henry C. Wood, Jonathan Pickering, Robert Hill, J. Franklin Paxson, Esq. (heirs of James S. Paxson), Isaac Wilson, and very many others, the daughters of Samuel Jamison among them. Joseph C. Jamison, Esq., held a part of it for many years, but he sold it to Howard Coates (who now holds it) and others, and purchased elsewhere in the township. He held the office of justice of the peace for ten years, retiring in 1879.


History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter LXIV. Little Britain Township.<1<[1 By John C. Lewis, Esq.]

Name: Gibson, William
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History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter LXIV. Little Britain Township.<1<[1 By John C. Lewis, Esq.]

Name: Gibson, William, Jr.
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: 2
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History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter LXIV. Little Britain Township.<1<[1 By John C. Lewis, Esq.]

The post-offices of the township have all been named in speaking of its villages or otherwise. Kirk's Mills post-office is kept in the store at Kirk's Mills. Oak Hill post-office was located in the store at that place. Little Britain post-office, as originally located, was at Gibson's Cross-Roads, and was kept in a wheelwright-shop belonging to John Gibson, Esq., but on his death was removed to the village of Elim, where it still remains. Fairmount post-office, established on the discontinuance of Oak Shade, is at the store of that name, and is supplied from the railroad.


History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter LXIV. Little Britain Township.<1<[1 By John C. Lewis, Esq.]

have already been incidentally mentioned, and it only now remains to recapitulate them in closer connection. The oldest mill is doubtless Adam Harkness', formerly Pierce's and, still further back, Clendenin's, on Pickens Creek. It is known to have been run by Joseph Hewes as far back as 1763, and may have been established by Robert Lewis at an earlier day. The Clendenins appear to have been a race of millers, three brothers of them owning three mills at one time, the one in question, and two on Western Octorara, in Colerain township. Samuel Connard's sawmill was established as a tilt-hammer, changed to different uses since, and is now a saw-mill, as stated. It was first made a water-power about 1801, and is the next in age. Kirk's mills, at Eastland, erected by Timothy and Jacob Kirk, come next in order, and are unquestionably the first in importance. James King's mill was established simply as a saw-mill by Levin H. Jackson in 1846, and the grinding apparatus added by King at a later day. J. B. Brogan's spoke-mill, at Oak Hill, is run by steam, and is only in operation at intervals. Blacksmith- and wheel-wright-shops exist in connection at the following places: On the property of John J. Pennel, south of Oak Hill; at Elim; on the property late of John Gibson, west of Elim; and at Oak Shade. There are blacksmith-shops separately at Oak Hill, at Fair Mount, and at Jacob Shade's, between Oak Shade and White Rock. Thomas J. Watson, at Ashville, and Marcenus King, a short distance west, have wheelwright-shops separately.

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men
Chapter XVIII. Lancaster County in the War of the Rebellion--(Continued)

William White.

Two of William (1747-1819) and Elizabeth (BARNETT) MOORHEAD's 12 children married GIBSONs:

7. Elizabeth Moorhead,  (Jul.14,1779- 17 Nov 1850) m. in 1796 Francis GIBSON (1774-2 Sep 1858 Mercer Co., PA), Francis was the son of Charles  GIBSON (d. 1828 Mercer Co., PA). Charles Gibson and William Moorhead were both Rev. War vets and apparently moved to NW PA to claim grant lands for their service. Gibson may have served under Moorhead at some point. Contact Jeff EVANS mayday@clover.net 

8. Mary Moorhead,b.Feb.4,1782,m.William GIBSON (and (2) James Craig per Connie)